Tea

Best foods for reducing stress and improving work performance

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Long and demanding work hours can really take a toll, with health and fitness commonly becoming a lower priority when work demands are high. Regular exercise can become difficult, and planning and preparing nutritious foods drops down the to-do list. Ironic really, when eating well and exercise are even more important when you are busy and need to be energised and functioning at your best.  

Many people find they might get through the morning ok, but by mid-afternoon can really start to slide. Lack of energy and focus can quickly lead to a hand in the biscuit barrel or a quick break to grab a different kind of sugar hit. The problem with this reactive approach is that after the initial energy rush, your blood glucose levels can drop which leads to a crash in energy levels and work performance. 

Here are 5 of the best foods and fluids to help your brain and body get you through to the end of your working day in top shape (from Eat Right For Your Life):

5 Best Foods and Fluids

Fish

Omega-3 fatty acids are a prominent component of neuronal membranes – essential for normal brain function. Many of us don't consume anywhere near enough omega-3 in our diets, and the best way to increase your intake is to eat more fish and seafood, particularly oily varieties such as salmon, sardines and mackerel.

Tea (black or green)

If you love your hot drinks at work, tea is the perfect option. Tea contains theanine, a compound which can have a direct impact on the brain to keep you alert but relaxed at the same time.  There is evidence suggesting that a good cup of tea is a great way to reduce stress. Tea also contains high levels of flavonoids, a type of antioxidant that has a positive effect on overall health. 

Fruit

Instead of reaching for the biscuits, keep your own fruit basket at work. Stock it up at the start of each week for a constant supply of nutritious snacks to boost energy levels and concentration for a busy working day. Any fruit is great, and variety is important, aim for at least six different fruits over a week. Bananas may be particularly beneficial for stress, they contain potassium, which can be good for blood pressure, and are low GI, which keeps your blood sugar and mood stable. 

Substantial Salads

A big salad with lean protein is the perfect lunch for a busy work day, and it doesn’t have to be rabbit food. A light and fresh salad can fill you up without leaving you feeling sluggish. For a different high-fibre spin, try your salad with chickpeas or 3-bean mix, or stick to the traditional protein sources of chicken, tuna, salmon or leftover lean roast meat. You can also try adding some nutrient-dense carbohydrate with sweet potato, sweet corn or quinoa.

Calamari

If you are looking for a nutritious lunchtime salad when you are away from the office, search for calamari on the menu.  But not the golden crumbed deep-fried rings - if you choose the marinated grilled or seared variety in an Asian style salad then you are on to a winner.  Seafood provides protein that is easily digested compared to a heavy steak and will help you to feel energised for the afternoon. Plus additional omega-3 fats for a healthy brain and body.

 

You will find the other 5 of my top 10 foods for corporate and high stress workers, and the best 10 foods for other stages of life, in my book Eat Right For Your Life.

My new book Super Food For Performance, in Work Sport and Life is due for release late October 2017, check it out for more info on high performance eating and practical snack and meal ideas and recipes.

Brain food for work and study - how to prevent the mid-afternoon brain fade

Do you sometimes find yourself sitting in front of your computer in the middle of the afternoon, staring into space and unable to focus on the task at hand? This happens in workplaces and schools all around the world every day at around 3pm. Think about what you eat for lunch. Does it include foods that will boost your brainpower or more likely to leave you feeling drained? The foods you eat at work or school can make a big difference to concentration, focus, productivity and learning later in the day. Not to mention the positive effect on mood and stress levels. Here are some nutrition tips to help keep you thinking clearly and on top of your game all day. 

Eat foods high in Omega-3 fatty acids

You may have heard before that eating fish is good for your brain. Omega-3 fatty acids are a prominent component of neuronal membranes – and fish are our best dietary source of these fats. The best way to increase your omega-3 intake is to eat more fish and seafood. Research has also shown that EPA predominant fish oil supplements may have benefits for individuals with diagnosed depression (however please see your qualified health professional to discuss your individual needs when it comes to nutrition supplements).

 Choose Low Glycemic Index

Stable blood glucose levels help to the brain continuously fuelled. High glycemic index foods which are quickly absorbed into the blood stream may cause erratic blood sugar levels which can effect energy levels and mood. If you choose wholegrain over high-sugar you can help to keep blood glucose stable and this means consistent brain fuel. Protein and healthy fats can also reduce the glycemic impact of a meal or snack.

Don’t go hungry

‘Hungry grumpy’ really is a thing! If you haven’t eaten enough you feel hungry and blood glucose levels can get quite low, leaving it hard to concentrate and having an impact on brain function. Keep your brain well-fuelled to improve your mood.

Drink enough fluid

Numerous studies have shown the benefits to athletic performance from being well-hydrated, from concentration to co-ordination to judgement. These same performance principles can apply to work and school scenarios, so keep up fluid intake in the morning and as the day progresses.

Drink tea

Sometimes we use caffeine as a pick-me-up, but this doesn’t address the real reason why you need that extra boost. By eating more wholefoods and less processed, you may not need the coffee. Nothing wrong with a daily coffee, but tea is a great option for your brain. Tea contains theanine, a compound which can have a direct impact on the brain to keep you alert but relaxed at the same time.

Mix up your fruits and vegetables

Several studies have shown a link between fruit and vegetable intake and improved mood and feelings of depression. It is difficult to determine which particular nutrients or antioxidants are of most benefit, but just another reason to include a wide variety of different fruit and vegetables every day.

Add probiotics

More and more research is showing links between the health of the gut and other body organs. A healthy gut may reduce inflammation throughout the body, and can impact on your brain and mood. More research is required, but by including probiotics from yoghurt, fermented foods and drinks we can help to keep our mind and body healthy.

If you are interested in more updates about the links between the food we eat and performance at work and sport, I would love to send you my free newsletter, just leave your details here. You can also follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for more regular nutrition updates, recipes and food ideas.